Finnish or Russian?

Everything has an end and now it’s time to say good-bye. Riitta and Jukka take us to the main street. Thank you, you two, for an insight into Finnish life! It was nice with to stay with you and hopefully we will see you soon in Germany or Portugal.

We continue along the Via Karelia. At the end of WWll large parts of Karelia were occupied by Russia. Even if only a small remnant belongs to Finland today, Karelia is the soul of the Finnish nation.The town of Nurmes is also called “the city of birches. These trees dominate the landscape. Our birches at home are much smaller. I have never seen such large and strong tribes as here.

The town of Nurmes is also called “the city of the birches”. These trees dominate the landscape. Our birches at home are much smaller. I have never seen such large and strong birch trunks as here.

Here in Nurmes stands the Bomba House, a replica of the once-biggest blockhouse of Karelia. The original was constructed by the Karelian farmer Jegor Bombin for his son from natural round wood without iron fittings and he constructed it really big: 25 meters long, 10 meters wide and three floors high. There were 24 people under the roof with their cattle. When the son died, the house was divided into its individual parts. The five stacks were shared among the five sons. A normal blockhouse could be built from each stack. In the middle of the last century, the house including a Karelian village was reconstructed here. Karelian traditions are cultivated and you can also enjoy the Karelian cuisine. Unfortunately, everything is closed.

 

A few kilometers further food is offered. We drive to the small farm.

 

Der Wirt zeigt uns einen Zettel, auf dem „ungarische Gulaschsuppe“ steht. Dann sagt er noch: „my country, 100 years birthday!“

The mother has cooked well, and on the wall, there are lots of socks and mittens for sale, presumably the work of the long dark winter.

The small reindeer are behind the fence, so they do not come to our list of seen wild animals, but an eagle and a squirrel.

 

 

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